Our artists & their art


Bay Gallery Home, Australian Aboriginal Art, Wallpaper, Tiles, Rugs, Tables & Accessories. Artists.

We have represented artists from the communities of Central Australia since 2008, and are proud to be the only dedicated Australian Aboriginal Art gallery in the UK. 

Bay Gallery Home's relationship with the Central Australian Aboriginal artists is one of trust, founded on respect for their heritage and contemporary way of life. In all our dealings we have the utmost consideration for the codes of conduct and sensibilities that surround the provenance of this ancient Art.

The Australian Aboriginal people are the one of the oldest continuous populations on earth, and their visual language is considered one of the world’s oldest Art forms, spanning over 50,000 years.  The connection to 'country' is essential. Their tribal Dreamings, creation and mapping myths, rituals and sacred topography inspire bold, beautiful abstract paintings featuring the landscape, plants and animals of Australia's central desert. The Aboriginals see no difference between themselves, the sky, the land and the animals they share it with.  All are one and the same.

Contemporary Aboriginal Art has been described as the last great Art movement of the 20th century, and notably featured heavily in the Royal Academy's landmark Royal ‘Australia’ exhibition (2015). It was also the subject of the British Museum’s ‘Indigenous Australia:  Enduring Civilisation’ exhibition (2016).

Aboriginal art is found in collections all over the world including the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France.  Bay Gallery Home’s work is collected internationally.

Below is a record of our artists and their stories.


Alma Nungarrayi Granites - Aboriginal Artist

As the world’s oldest continuous living culture, Aboriginal people can claim to be the world’s first astronomers. For them, gazing at the stars is about more than making out and naming constellations.

Alma Nungurrayi Granitesis a Highly Regarded Artist who paints the great Warlpiri story of the Seven Sisters Dreaming. She tells the narrative of the ancestral Napaljarri sisters who are found in the night sky in the star cluster known as the Pleiades, in the constellation Taurus. The Pleiades are seven women often depicted in paintings of this Jukurrpa carrying the Jampijinpa man Wardilyka, who is in love with the Napaljarri-warnu, and who is represented in the Orion’s Belt cluster of stars.

Alma Nungarrayi Granites began painting in 1987, but it was in 2007 that she made the decision to become a dedicated and accomplished artist. Her concern was for the preservation of the Jukurrpa, the designs and stories being passed onto her from her mother and her father. Alma explored her own ways of representing the ancient Jukurrpa by using innovating painting methods and designs while keeping to the traditional aspects of symbols and meaning.

To do this Alma studied the Seven Sisters Dreaming in depth through her father, famous artist Paddy Japaljarri Sims. She made journeys to the significant sites, which forged in her stronger links to the land where the stories takes place. Sites such as the large round rocks of Yanjirlpirri country create a powerful landscape, where the sky and land blend together in the hours leading up to sunset.

When considering the role of the stars in Aboriginal culture, Ray Norris astronomer and adjunct professor in the department of Indigenous Studies at Macquarie University Sydney says “There is a lot of astronomy used in the Australian Aboriginal culture and it goes way beyond naming constellations and telling stories. The Aboriginals were quite sophisticated, they used the stars to determine how the tides work, how planets move, where to find food."

“We have a site – there may be others – where stones lined up to indicate when the sun sets on midsummer’s day and midwinter’s day – the Aboriginal Stonehenge if you like. The Aboriginal people were nomadic, so they needed to know in advance when it was time to move and they used the stars for this.

Perth astro-photographer John Goldsmith is also researching Aboriginal astronomical knowledge. “Cultures all over the world, including ancient cultures, used the stars for all sorts of reasons,” he said.  “The star patterns were important for Aboriginal people, they used their stars for things like navigation, time keeping, calendars and searching for food.”

There is a direct link of knowledge of the night sky with what is happening on the ground.” Mr Goldsmith says there is a strong link between astronomy and history. “The night sky is a really rich source of human history and culture,” he said. “All the cultures around the world have stories and knowledge wrapped up in the stars. The sky is like a global history book for those than can interpret it.”  


 

Athena Nangala Granites - Aboriginal Artist

Yanjirlypirri is the Warlpiri name for stars, and also a small hill to the west of Yuendumu, where there is a water soakage. The importance of this place cannot be overemphasized as young boys are brought here to be initiated from as far as Pitjanjatjara country to the south and Lajamanu to the north. 

This painting tells of the journey of Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men who travelled from Kurlurngalinypa (near Lajamanu) to Yanjirlypirri, and on to Lake Mackay on the West Australian border. Along the way they performed ‘kurdiji’ (initiation ceremonies) for young men. Napaljarri and Nungarrayi women also danced for the ‘kurdiji’. 

For this ceremony the men wear ‘jinjirla’ (white feather headdresses). They also wear wooden carvings of stars, which are also laid out on the ground as part of the sand paintings produced for ceremonial business. ‘Ngalyipi’ (snake vine), is depicted as long curved lines and is used to tie ‘witi’ (ceremonial spears) vertically to the shins of the dancing initiates. These ‘witi’ are typically shown as long straight lines and the ‘yanjirlpirri’ (stars) are usually depicted as white circles or roundels.


 

Lee Nangala Gallagher-Wayne - Aboriginal Artist

”I find painting very contemplative.

Lee Nangala Gallagher-Wayne was born in 1958 in Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west of Alice Springs in the NT of Australia.

She lived most of her life in Yuendumu, but when her husband passed away in 2003 she moved to Nyirripi, a further 160 km west of Yuendumu, where her mother still lives. Nyirripi is her father’s country and her mother is Mary Napangardi Gallagher, a well-known artist who also paints. Lee has one sister and three brothers. She has three children, two sons and one daughter and one adopted child from her younger sister. She has lots of grandkids. Lee went to Yuendumu School and after completing school she worked for the Central Desert Shire (CDS) Council Trust, cooking for the aged.

She has been painting since 2006. She began painting after “watching all those old people doing painting.” She says she feels better when she’s painting. Lee paints her father’s Jukurrpa stories, Dreamings that relate directly to her father’s land, its features and the plants and animals that inhabit it. These stories have been passed down for millennia. She particularly likes painting her father’s Jukurrpa, especially Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) and Yunkaranyi Jukurrpa (Flying Ants), Dreamings that relate to her country between Nyirripi and Yuendumu.

Lee uses the traditional Aboriginal colours of black, yellow and red, acrylic colours that imitate the ochres found in the area.


 

Mary Napangardi Gallagher - Aborginal Artist

Mary Napangardi Gallagher was born in Napperby, a homestead 120 km from Papunya. When she was a young adult she moved with her family to Yuendumu. She met and married her husband in Yuendumu and later moved to Nyirripi to bring up her five children Ben, Duncan, Richard, Eldy and Rea, and several grandchildren.

Mary and her grown-up children still live in Nyirripi, a remote Aboriginal community 160 km north-west of Yuendumu. Mary has been painting since 2006. Yuendumu is also a remote Aboriginal community located 290 km north-west of Alice Springs in the NT of Australia. The art centre staff regularly visit Nyirripi to collect finished work and drop off canvas, paint and brushes for the artists.

Mary paints her father’s Jukurrpa, Dreamings which relate to Pikilyi Jukurrpa (Vaughan Springs) a large and important waterhole; and Janmarda Jukurrpa (Bush Onion Dreaming). Mary remembers playing in this area as a child, while collecting bush tucker with her family.

The Jukurrpa (dreaming) at Napperby belongs to all Napangardi, Napanangka, Japangardi and Japanangka and has been passed down for millennia. When Mary is not painting she likes to go hunting with her family for goanna and bush tucker.


 

Margaret Napangardi Brown - Aboriginal Artist

Margaret Napangardi Brown was born in 1940 at Mount Doreen Station, an extensive cattle breeding station about 55 km west of Yuendum. She is the eldest of four children all of whom have passed away. She remembers travelling around with her family and her parents teaching her about the traditional ways.

Margaret now lives in Nyirripi, an Aboriginal Community 460 kms north-west of Alice Springs, in the Central Desert of Australia. She married Pegleg Jampijinpa, a successful Pintupi artist who passed away in early 2006. She has one daughter, Joy Nangala Brown, who also paints for, and one son Thompson.

Margaret is now a great grandmother. Margaret has been painting with Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed Art Centre, since 2005. She paints her Great grand- father’s Jukurrpa stories, Dreamings that relate to their land, its features and the animals and plants that live on the land.

These stories have been passed down for millennia. When Margaret is not painting she loves looking after her grandchildren and going hunting. 


 

Sarah Napurrurla White - Aboriginal Artist

Sarah Napurrurla White was born in 1969 in Alice Springs. She lived with her parents at Mission Creek but moved to Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west of Alice Springs in the NT of Australia, when she was very young.

She went to Yarara College in Alice Springs. She use to visit Yuendumu often and while staying with her family, she met Ben Jangala Gallagher whom she married. They now live in Nyirripi and have one daughter. Sarah has been painting since 2007.

She learnt to paint by watching her Aunty, the successful Long Maggie Nakamarra White. It was from Maggie that Sarah learnt to paint her grandfather’s Jukurrpa; Warna Jukurrpa (Snake Dreaming), a sacred Jukurrpa.

She also likes to paint Janmarda Jukurrpa (Bush Onion Dreaming) because she likes the designs and patterns. When she’s not painting Sarah works for the aged and children. On weekends she loves to go huntng with the old people. 


 

Shorty Jangala Robertson

Shorty Jangala Robertson was born in 1925 at Jila (Chilla Well), a large soakage and claypan north west of Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community located 290 kms north-west of Alice Springs in the NT of Australia.

He lived a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle with his parents, older brother and extended Warlpiri family. They travelled vast distances across desert country, passing through Warlukurlangu, south west of Jila and Ngarlikurlangu, north of Yuendumu, visiting his skin brothers.

His childhood memories consist of stories associated with the Coniston massacre of Aboriginal people and close to Jila, families were shot at Wantaparri. Shorty Jangala Robertson had virtually no contact with white fellas during his youth but remembers leaving Jila for Mt Theo ‘to hide’ from being shot.

His father died at Mt Theo and then with his mother moved to Mt Doreen Station, and subsequently the new settlement of Yuendumu. During World War II, the army took people from Yuendumu to the other Warlpiri settlement at Lajamanu. Shorty was taken from his mother, however, she came to get him, on foot and together they travelled hundreds of miles back to Chilla Well.

Drought, a lack of food and medical supplies forced Shorty and his family back to Yuendumu. His working life was full of adventure and hard work for different enterprises in the Alice Springs Yuendumu area. He finally settled at Yuendumu in 1967 after the Australian Citizen Referendum. 

It is extraordinary in all his travels and jobs over his whole working life, that he escaped the burgeoning and flourishing Central Desert art movement of the 1970’s and 1980’s. Thus Shorty’s paintings are fresh, vigorous and new. His use of colour to paint and interpret his dreamings of Ngapa (Water), Watiyawarnu (Acacia), Yankirri (Emu) and Pamapardu (Flying Ant) is vital, yet upholding the Warlpiri painting tradition.

This fledgling artist, well into his 70’s when he started painting had his first solo exhibition at Alcaston Gallery in 2003 which was met with great acclaim. Since then he has exhibited in Aboriginal Art Exhibitions in Australia and overseas. 


 

Danielle Ngwarraye Turner - Aboriginal Artist

The community of Ampilatwatja made a conscious decision not to paint ‘altyerr’ dreaming stories, instead the artsts paint their country, where those stories sit.

This painting shows the layered landscape of Alyawarr, Central Australia. Knowing your country is an important part of living in a remote community like Ampilatwatja. Knowing when and where to go hunting and gathering, knowing where there is 'soakage' (where you can dig for water), travelling with family for ceremonies, and maintaining a connection with the land.

"This is my country, my view of country."


 

Joycie Morton -  Aboriginal Artist

Joycie's husband is from Ampilatwatja and she has lived here for many years, however her country is "out Rum Jungle Way." In 1952 the Australian Government funded the setting up of a mine and treatment plant to provide uranium oxide concentrate to the UK- US under a contract which ran from 1953 to 1962. Rum Jungle was then the largest construction in the Northern Territory.

The Rum Jungle mine closed in 1971. One of the main environmental impacts of uranium mining is the creation of large volumes of radioactive mine waste (tailings) which are left behind on the site. Joycie's land is still recovering from the damage that was done.


 

Lily Kemara Morton -  Aboriginal Artist


Lilly is sister to Daisy and Milly, mother to Jessie and Julieanne, and grandmother to Kindy, Levina and Gracie – all of whom are excellent artists, and all of whom are inspired by Lilly's paintings and her stories of life before white man, living traditionally off of the land and walking with her mother and grandmothers across their country.


Lilly's husband Banjo is the man that led the well-known walk off from Ampilatwatja community. The first time it was a walk off with a small group of other Aboriginal stockmen demanding wages instead of rations, in 1949. Most recently in 2009 it was all about trying to find a better way of life for his people.


Lilly was involved in the Utopian batik movement back in the 1980's and she has been successfully painting ever since. Her paintings are highly sought after and depict her favourite hunting and gathering areas and the plants that grow there.


 

Robina Jones -  Aboriginal Artist


Robina is Angeline Luck’s grand-daughter. She is one of the new young artists at Ampilatwatja. She is learning to paint using bush tucker designs.

She shows a very nice stylised interpretation of the main plants available to the community. She also likes to paint ‘purtiplow’, pretty flowers that grow in country. Robina spends her time looking after her baby daughter and in her spare time she likes to paint.


 

Rosie Ross -  Aboriginal Artist
 

Rosie was born out bush near Amaroo Station, in Alyawarr country. Her Mother, now passed, was one of the original artists in the Utopian Batik movement along with her Aunties, artists Lilly and Daisy Kemarre.


Rosie, who possesses a wonderful use of colour, especially likes to paint bush medicine and wild flowers from the surrounding areas. Her Daughter Margaret Kemarre Ross is also an artist and has inherited a similar expressive, bright, beautiful style.


 

Glory Ngarla - Aboriginal Artist

Born in 1948 at Boundary Bore, she passed away in 2002 – but not before painting some stunning depictions of her dreamings Bush Plum, Yam Dreaming and Body Paint.  She uses soft brush tips in bright colours which almost look like weave work.


Glory started her artistic career as a batik artist in the 1970’s.  Her work features in the book Utopia - A picture Story by Anne Marie Brody.  Her work toured Adelaide, Sydney and Darwin in te 1980’s.  In 1994 she also visited Indonesia to improve her knowledge of batik.


Her husband was the famous artist Emily Kame Kngwarreye's first cousin.  She is also the younger sister of the late Motor Car Jim.


 

Michael Nelson Jagamara - Aboriginal Artist


Michael Nelson Jagamara is a senior Warlpiri tribesman from the Western Desert, Northern Territory and custodian of many Dreaming stories born circa 1946. Jagamara’s painting career began in 1981 at Papunya, he is now one of the most widely collected and prominent Aboriginal artists. His most famous piece is a mosaic, which was commissioned by the Australian government and it lies outside the national Parliament.


His style of work in this show started in 1998 after year’s of traditionally coloured, layered dot and circle work.  This new work was entitled the New Expression series. The complex ceremonial ground and body designs and dreaming stories relating to the yam, possum, kangaroo, lightning and snake are still contained within these works just more vividly expressed than ever before, "I thought to myself - I'll do different way to them mob instead of copying them. Do my own way."

In 1984 he won the National Aboriginal Art Award; in 1986 he exhibited in the Biennale of Sydney. In 1987 an eight metre painting by him was installed in the foyer of the Sydney Opera House. He visited the USA with Billy Stockman in 1988 for the opening of the "Dreamings: Art of Aboriginal Australia" exhibition in New York. In 1989 he had his first solo exhibition, followed by shows in 1990 and 1993. In 1993 he received the Order of Australia Medal for services to Aboriginal art, and in 1994 he received a Fellowship from the Visual Arts Board of the Australia Council.


Jagamara grew up in the bush and remembers hiding in fear at his first sight of white men at Mt Doreen station. His parents had him educated at a mission school at Yuendemu until he was thirteen. He left school after initiation, and worked at buffalo shooting, driving trucks, droving cattle followed by the army, before returning to Yuendemu and then settling at Papunya.
He is the subject of a major publication by Vivian Johnson (Michael Jagamara Nelson, 1997).


 

Raymond Walters Japanangka - Aboriginal Artist
 

Raymond was born in Alice Springs November 1975. Raymond comes from a family of well-known artists which include his grandfather Jack Cook, his grandmother the famous Emily Kngwarreye and late grandmother Minnie Pwerle, Aunties Margaret Scobie, Gloria Petyerre, Barbara Weir, and Kathleen Petyerre.

Raymond's Grandfather's country is Yuelamu (Mt Allan) and his Grandmother's country is Boundry Bore˜Alhalkerre (Utopia). His language groups are Anmatyerre and Alywarre.

Raymond has a contemporary and unique style of painting, using a wide range of colours and textures. His art is an opportunity to share his life experiences and cultural knowledge that has been passed down from his Grandparents and extended family members.
 

These are Raymond's Dreamings:

Mountain Devil Lizard (Thorny Devil)
This is a contemporary style of Raymond's Grandmothers Mountain Devil Lizard Dreaming.  This dreaming plays an important role in ceremony. The colours of the Mountain Devil Lizard signify ochres that were deposited during the dreamtime in specific areas that are now collected for ceremonial purposes. Raymond uses the pattern found on the back of the Mountain Devil Lizard and its habitat of Spinifex grass to create a unique painting.

Emu Dreaming
This is Raymond's interpretation of his own Emu dreaming. He paints the front breast of the adult Emu. His mixtures of bright colours add to the uniqueness of his paintings. Texture of Emu footprints and nesting sites, water holes, and other significant sites are also featured to add another dimension to his paintings. The Emu is an important part of Aboriginal ceremony. It is significant in the make up of the men's ceremonial dress. The male Emu plays the main role of nurturing its young. This is also an important role Aboriginal men play within their communities.

Water Dreaming
Using a layered textured technique Raymond has created a unique interpretation of his Grandfather's Water Dreaming. Water is an essential part of life. Tools were used to carve water signs on rocks that signified where water could be found. Raymond uses his fingers to create the Water Dreaming paintings.

Atnangkerre Growth or Bush Damper Seed
Raymond paints circles of various sizes scattered across a contrasting coloured canvas.  These circles represent bush damper seed found in Atnangkerre country.  The irregular placing of bold lines on the canvas convey the bush damper stem.  The seed is collected and crushed into a flour that is used to make damper.


 

William Pwerle Ross - Aboriginal Artist
 

William Pwerle Ross was born circa 1940, and is a senior man in Utopia, Irrultja.  His country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Anmatyerre and Alyawarre.  He is the brother of the famous artist David Pwerle Ross.


Ross’ paintings hold significant importance due to his role as law man in the region.  As an important person of the Irrultja community, William has many responsibilities in overseeing and teaching the younger men.  William began painting in 2005 after encouragement from community members.  He has developed several styles since; however, the use of traditional colours is consistent in all his works, as is the linear design.  William usually paints small vertical brush strokes that appear as rows of small blocks meandering freely across the canvas.  The brush strokes represent the designs painted in men’s sacred ceremony, which are usually created on the ground as a sand painting, on the body with ochre & fat, or on specific ceremonial objects such as shields and headgear.


Recently William has created beautiful works that consist of rows of fine dots that alternate in carefully selected hues.  These paintings posses an organic rhythm that speaks out to the viewer and presents a strong impression of the spirituality required in Men’s Ceremony.  In such modern dot representation, the sacred aspect of the painting is not always revealed, but the meaning remains, transmitted through symbols or designs, easily understood by initiated men.


Ross’s work has been exhibited throughout Australia and in Paris, France. This is the first time he is exhibited in the UK.


 

Emily Pwerle - Aboriginal Artist


Emily Pwerle’s country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Anmatyerre and Alyawarr.  She is in her late 80's, possibly born in 1922 (no records exist). Emily lives in Irrultja, a tiny settlement in Utopia of about 100 people.  She has had little exposure to western culture and picked up a paintbrush for the first time in 2004.  

Emily’s extended family are all artists: Barbara Weir, Aileen and Betty Mpetyane, and her older sister, the late Minnie Pwerle.  Emily was encouraged by all to paint along with her sisters Gayla and Molly Pwerle. It wasn’t until late 2004 that Barbara Weir, Minnie Pwerle’s daughter, organised the first workshop for the sisters, which was held at Irrultja station. This workshop heralded the start of an amazing artistic talent.  Just as Minnie showed the glorious freedom of expression, Emily, Molly and Galya followed suit.  Minnie took a close and supportive role in the development of her younger sisters. The sisters had an instant response to applying paint onto canvas, developing expressions of their dreamings that have been passed down from generation to generation.   

Emily paints “Awelye Atnwengerrp”, meaning women’s ceremony, which is depicted by a series of lines and symbols, often criss-crossed patterns that are layered across the canvas with colours that are explosive, colourful and energetic. The patterns represent the designs painted on women's bodies during bush tucker ceremonies in Atnwengerrp. Emily has developed her own unique, contemporary style and is proving to be a prolific, energetic and talented artist, akin to her late sister Minnie Pwerle.


 

Gloria Petyarre - Aboriginal Artist
 


 

Lizzie Pwerle - Aboriginal Artist


Lizzie Pwerle is an emerging Aboriginal artist living in Utopia.  Her country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Anmatyarre & Alyawarre. Lizzie has been painting on canvas since the 1980’s and was involved in the batik projects of the 1970s. She is the first cousin to the Pwerle Sisters (Galya, Molly, Emily & the late Minnie Pwerle).

Lizzie paints ‘Womens Ceremony’ using intricate and varied dots in circular forms and linear designs.  In 2008 Lizzie began panting ‘Bush Orange’ which is represented by lines of fine dots of Bush Orange branches sprawled across the canvas. The Bush Orange Lizzie paints is a particular fruit that grows in Atnwengerrp.  Once very abundant but now scarce due to over grazing, this species was a stable source of bush tucker for Aboriginals. The fruit grows on a thin long stalk and is larger than a passionfruit.   It is green when unripe turning yellow in maturity.  It is soft inside and is often compared to the flavour of custard apple.  The fruit is consumed raw with the tough outer skin discarded or laid out to dry; consumed during months when bush tucker is scarce.

The physical creation of this Dreaming is an important part of the bush tucker ceremonies conducted by the Utopia women. Artworks such as ‘Bush Orange’ & ‘Womens Ceremony’ ensures the continuation of an ancient and rich cultural heritage while acknowledging the close bond still retained by the artist to her country.


 

Molly Pwerle - Aboriginal Artist
 

Molly Pwerle’s country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Anmatyerre and Alyawarr.  She was born in approximately 1919 (no records exist) and has had little exposure to western culture. In fact, Molly picked up a paintbrush for the first time in 2004. Molly's extended family are all artists including her sister the late Minnie Pwerle, Barbara Weir, Aileen and Betty Mpetyane, who all encouraged Molly and her younger sisters Gayla and Emily Pwerle to paint with their famed sister Minnie. 

Molly paints ‘Awelye Atnwengerrp’, meaning Women’s Ceremony in her country.   ‘Awelye-Atnwengerrp’ is depicted by a series of lines painted in different widths, patterns and colours that are explosive, colourful and energetic. The patterns represent the designs painted on women's bodies during bush tucker ceremonies in Atnwengerrp.  Molly has developed her own unique, contemporary style and is progressing into a major talent.

Molly’s work is integral to keeping the culture alive through the passing onthese symbols and patterns ensuring the survival of her people in the harsh desert conditions of Australia.


 

Galya Pwerle - Aboriginal Artist
 

Galya Pwerle’s country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Anmatyerre and Alyawarr.  She is in her early 80's (no birth records exist) and has had little exposure to western culture. In fact, Galya picked up a paintbrush for the first time in 2004. 

The youngest of the Pwerle Sisters, most of Galya’s family are all artists including her oldest sister, the late Minnie Pwerle, her niece Barbara Weir, plus her extended family Aileen and Betty Mpetyane.  All encouraged Galya and her older sisters Molly and Emily, to paint with their famed sister Minnie in 2004.Barbara Weir organised the first workshop of the sisters which was held at Ultja station. This inaugural workshop heralded the start of an amazing painting experience.  Just as Minnie showed the glorious freedom of expression, Molly, Emily and Galya followed suit.  Another workshop was arranged and so it continues. Minnie took a close and supportive role in the development of her younger sisters. The sisters had an instant response to applying paint onto canvas and developing expressions of their dreamings that have been passed down from generation to generation.  The passing on of these symbols and patterns ensures the survival of these peoples’ culture. 

Galya paints "Awelye Atnwengerrp" which means women's ceremony, celebrating Bush Tucker which in Galya's case, is Bush Melon or Bush Tomato and its Seed. "Bush Melon Seed" is depicted by small curved brushstrokes while the "Bush Melon" works consists of blunt paintbrush dabs that are layered across a body paint design background. The patterns represent the designs painted on women's bodies during bush tucker ceremonies, in Atnwengerrp.  Both styles use various colours to form abstract pieces of great beauty. During these ceremonies the women dance, and sing, paying homage to their ancestors, the land and the food it provides. 

Galya is continually developing her own unique, contemporary style and is proving to be an exciting and progressive artist.  In 2005 and 2008 her work was nominated in the prestigious Telstra Awards held in Darwin.


 

Jessie Pitjara Hunter - Aboriginal Artist
 

Jessie Pitjara Hunter was born in 1957 at MacDonald Downs and is the sister of renowned artists Sandy, Annie and Susan.  Jessie paints intricate designs consisting of many fine dots woven together that represent her country and her dreaming.

Dreaming
Alyawerre country, sugar bag body design.

Collections
Aboriginal Art Museum, The Netherlands.
Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane.
The National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.
The Holmes a Court Collection, Perth.

Exhibitions
1985 -‘The Second National Aboriginal Art Award Exhibition’, Museum and Art Gallery of the    Northern Territory, Darwin.
1989 - ‘A Myriad of Dreaming: Twentieth Century Aboriginal Art’, Westpac Gallery, Melbourne.
1989 - Design Warehouse Sydney [through Lauraine Diggins Fine Art];
1989 - ‘Utopia Women's Paintings, the First Works on Canvas, A Summer Project’, S. H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney.
1990 - ‘Utopia - A Picture Story’, an exhibition of 88 works on silk from the Holmes a Court Collection by Utopia artists which toured Eire and Scotland.
2005 - ‘Black Ink: Indigenous Prints from the Queensland Art Gallery Collection’, Queensland        Art Gallery, Brisbane.
2007 - ‘Desert Diversity’, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne.
2007 - ‘Standing on Ceremony’, Tandanya Aboriginal Cultural Institute, Adelaide.
2006-8 - Permanent Collection, Dacou Gallery, Adelaide.
2008 - ‘Utopia Discoveries’, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne.
2008 - ‘EWB Elements’, Engineers Without Borders travelilng exhibition to major cities in Australia in conjunction with Dacou and Dreamtime Elements.


 

Susan Pitjara Hunter - Aboriginal Artist
 

Susan Pitjara (also spelt Petyarre) Hunter was born circa 1966 into the Alyawarre tribe in Utopia. Susan is the younger sister of artists Annie Pitjara Hunter, Jessie Pitjara Hunter and Sandy Pitjara Hunter.  She resides at the outstation of Irrultja on Utopia in the Eastern Desert and lives a traditional life spending all her time in the bush with her husband Clement.

Susan Pitjara Hunter (also known as Susie) is one of the most gifted young emerging artists of this region. Susan has exhibited in various fine art galleries within Australian and overseas.  For such a young artist, Susan has always had a deep sense of belonging to her country and has remained steadfastly 'outbush'.  Her meticulous execution of Women's Business is rendered with extreme care and respect for her subject matter. The end result is a beautiful myriad of intricate patterns symbolising her Dreaming.

In her paintings Susie depicts women's ceremonial sites or dreaming places where women are gathered. The land and women are painted as if seen from an aerial perspective. The women’s bodies are decorated with natural ochres of red, white and yellow.   The women sit and chant the songlines that have been passed down to them from their ancestors. It is at these ceremonial meetings that the women pass on their tribal Dreamings to the younger ones and pay homage to their ancestors, the land and food it produces.  These Dreamings and ceremonies teach the community the rules of life in the desert environment.

Collections
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
Robert Holmes a Court Collection, Perth

Exhibitions
1989 - A Myriad of Dreaming. Twentieth Century Aboriginal Art, Westpac Gallery, Melbourne
1989 - Utopia Women's Paintings, the First Works on Canvas, A Summer Project, 1988-89, S. H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney.
1989-91 - Utopia - A Picture Story, Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute, Adelaide
1990 - ‘Utopia - A Picture Story,' an exhibition of 88 works on silk from the Holmes a Court Collection by Utopia artists which toured Eire & Scotland.
1991, 92,93,94,96 - Araluen Centre for the Arts, Alice Springs,NT
1997 - ‘Geschichtenbilder’, Aboriginal Art Gallery Bahr, Speyer, Germany.
1999 - ‘Aboriginal Art - Australien Now’, Deutsche Welle, Koln, Germany (in co-operation with the Aboriginal Art Gallery Bahr, Speyer)
1999 - ‘Australie – Art, Arts d'Australie’, Stephane Jacob / J.L. Amsler -                 Bastille, Paris.
2004 - ‘Bilderwelten in Utopia’, Holzschnitte und Gemaelde vom Aborigines, Staedtisches Kunstmuseum Spendhaus Reutlingen, Kunstmuseum Bayreuth, Germany (in cooperation with the Aboriginal Art Gallery Bahr, Speyer)
2006 - ‘Senior Women of Utopia’, GalleryG, Brisbane
2006 - ‘Utopia’, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne
2007 - ‘Standing on Ceremony’, Tandanya Cultural Institute, Adelaide
2007 - ‘Patterns of Power, Art from the Eastern Desert’, Simmer on the Bay Gallery, Sydney
2007 - ‘Eastern Desert Dreaming-Artists from Utopia’, GalleryG, Brisbane
2007 - ‘Desert Diversity’, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne
2006-8 - Permanent Collection, Dacou Gallery, Adelaide
2008 - ‘Utopia Discoveries’, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, VIC.
2008- ‘EWB Elements’, Engineers Without Borders travelling group exhibition to major cities ofAustralia in conjunction with Dacou and Dreamtime Elements.


 

Katie Morgan - Aboriginal Artist
 

Katie Morgan is an emerging aboriginal artist living in Utopia.  Her country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Alyawarre.  Katie has been painting on canvas since the 1980’s and was involved in the batik projects of the 1970s.  Her sister Jannie Morgan is also an artist.  Their mother Lena Morgan, passed away some time now; however, they are close to their aunt, the artist Lizzie Pwerle and her family.

Katie’s dreaming is the “ Bush Orange” or “Wild Orange”.  Katie paints intricate and varied dots across the canvas that represent the Bush Orange plant, its flowers and fruits, from an aerial perspective.  These beautiful organiccosmic-like creations, demonstrate Katie’s spiritual connection with her culture and country. Bush Orange is also known in Alyawarre as ‘akarley’.  Once very abundant but now scarce due to over grazing, this species was a stable source of bush tucker for Aboriginals.  The plant is more related to the caper plant than the orange tree.  The fruit grows on a shrub about 3.5m high with weeping foliage and produces large white flowers.  The fragrant small fruit hangs on long stalks and is green when unripe turning yellow or reddish in maturity. The fruit has a sweet flavour and is consumed raw with the tough outer skin discarded.  

The physical creation of this Dreaming is an important part of the bush tuckerceremonies conducted by the Utopia women. Artworks such as ‘Bush Orange’ ensures the continuation of an ancient and rich cultural heritage while acknowledging the close bond still retained by the artist to her country.
 

Exhibitions
1989 - “A Myriad of Dreaming” Twentieth Century Aboriginal Art, Westpac Gallery, Melbourne Design Warehouse, Sydney, NSW.
1989 - “A Myriad of Dreaming” Twentieth Century Aboriginal Art, Westpac Gallery, Melbourne Design Warehouse, Sydney, NSW.
1989 - “Utopia Women’s Paintings – the first Works on Canvas.  A Summer Project 1988-89”, S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney, NSW.
1989-91 - “Utopia – a Picture Story”, Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute, Adelaide, SA.
1990 - “Utopia – a Picture Story”, an exhibition of 88 works on silk from the Holmes a Court Collection by Utopia artists which toured Eire and Scotland.
2007 - “Standing on Ceremony”, Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute, Adelaide, SA.
2007-8 - Permanent Exhibition, Dacou Gallery, Adelaide, SA.
2008 - “Utopia Discoveries”, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, VIC.
2008 - “EWB Elements”, Engineers Without Borders, travelling group exhibition to major cities in Australia.


 

Barbara Weir - Aboriginal Artist
 

Barbara Weir was born circa 1945 at what was formerly known as Bundy Station in the Utopia region. Her country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Anmatyerre and Alyawarr.
Barbara’s dreamings include ‘Bush Berry’, ‘My Mothers Country’, ‘Awelye’ and her famous ‘Grass Seed’ dreaming. Barbara’s paintings have been exhibited extensively throughout Australia and the world, including Japan, America and Europe.

At the age of nine, Barbara - the daughter of the famous painter Minnie Pwerle and Jack Weir, an Irish man: was taken by Native Welfare while out collecting water.  She became one of what is known as the ‘Stolen Generation’.  While Barbara’s family believed she was killed she was placed in homes all over Australia. At 19 she made her way back to Utopia determined to reclaim her heritage and be united with her mother.  This history brings particular resonance to the paintings of ‘My Mother’s Country’.

She is a well documented artist featured in numerous publications. In 2004 she was chosen by the Australian Tourist Commission to appear in an advertisement titled ‘Barbara Weir’s Australia’.

Barbara is a versatile and passionate artist whose love for her country is reflected in each canvas she paints. She is highly skilled in the use of dot work shown in her depictions of ‘My Mothers Country’, and is ingenious in her use of lines and texture as shown in ‘Grass Seed’ dreamings.

Barbara Weir is one of Utopia’s premier artists and Bay Gallery highly recommends one of her paintings be included in any art lover’s collection.


 

Jannie Morgan - Aboriginal Artist
 

Jannie Morgan is an emerging aboriginal artist living in Utopia.  Her country is Atnwengerrp and her language is Alyawarre. Jannie has been painting on canvas since the 1980’s and was involved in the batik projects of the 1970s.  Her sister Katie Morgan is also an artist.  Their mother Lena Morgan, passed away some time now; however, they are close to their aunt, the artist Lizzie Pwerle and her family.   

Jannie’s dreaming is the “Bush Orange” or “Wild Orange”.  Jannie paints intricate and varied dots in circular forms across the canvas, representing the Bush Orange plant, its flowers and fruits. Bush Orange is also known in Alyawarre as ‘akarley’.  Once very abundant but now scarce due to over grazing, this species was a stable source of bush tucker for Aboriginals.  The plant is more related to the caper plant than the orange tree.  The fruit grows on a shrub about 3.5m high with weeping foliage and produces large white flowers recognisable by their long prominent ridges. The fragrant small fruit hangs on long stalks and is green when unripe turning yellow or reddish in maturity. The fruit has a sweet flavour and is consumed raw with the tough outer skin discarded.    

The physical creation of this Dreaming is an important part of the bush tuckerceremonies conducted by the Utopia women. Artworks such as ‘Bush Orange’ ensures the continuation of an ancient and rich cultural heritage while acknowledging the close bond still retained by the artist to her country.


Art in the Everyday  

Art in the Everyday