Dreamtime

Bay Gallery Home, Art, Aboriginal, My Country, NEWS

Our 'My Country' velvet collection

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Bay Gallery Home brings you our My Country Ruth Blue, Red and Pink cotton velvet collection. As the latest edition to our award winning Aboriginal interiors collection we have chosen Aboriginal ‘Goanna Dreaming’ paintings by Ruth Nungarrayi Spencer selected on our last trip to the Central Desert communities we represent.

My Country embodies the Dreamtime stories still followed by this ancient culture for use in the every day.

One of the the four interiors surfaces (wallpapers, rugs, ceramic wall tiles and fabrics),  My Country references the Aboriginal philosophy and creative process, whereby all of creation is in relationship, at one with the land.  The original artworks'  particular provenance and symbols - inspired by mapping myths, rituals and sacred topography - results in a compelling, versatile aesthetic with a most subtle compositional depth of field, imbuing spaces with wider horizons of the imagination.

Our designers used techniques combined with high-res scanning process to accurately match every detail and color of the artists’ paintings.

The beauty and quality of our velvets reflect the origins of indigenous creative process and high-quality materials and British manufacturing skill.

We also offer a bespoke Made to Order service as well as selling the velvets by the metre.

Photography by Annabel Smith Interiors

Made by Kelli J Angell

Bay Gallery Home, Aboriginal, Art, Dreamtime, Europe Aboriginal art, Interior Design, inspiration, Made in the UK, New Art, NEWS, provenance, Visual Language, World of Interiors

Fabulous Aboriginal fabrics coming to Bay Gallery Home soon

Bay Gallery Home is working hard on creating 'Songlines' our first collection of fabrics based on paintings by artists we proudly represent.  We have developed the world's first Aboriginal velvets available in three colours with slightly differing depictions of the Goanna Dreaming (Warnu Jukurrpa) - essentially a love story set in the Central Desert of Australia.  In keeping with our 'design with origin' ethos we have been faithful to the original artwork in the design work thereby protecting the Dreamtime story and the intent of the artist.  Keep an eye on the website over the next month or so as beautiful tableware, blinds and cushions will be amongst our first offerings.

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Aboriginal, Art, Bay Gallery Home, Dreamtime, giftware, Europe Aboriginal art, inspiration, Interior Design, Made in the UK, My Country, NEWS, Rug, tile, wallpaper

Testimonial page

We have recently built a Testimonial page under our About section on the website.  If you have bought from us and would like to give us some feedback please email us at alexandra@baygalleryhome.com and we will add your comments to our site.  

We send products all over the world ensuring they are all the best quality and safely packaged and as such we've never had anything returned, which we're very proud of.  

If you intend to buy from us but are mulling over which wonderful Bay Gallery Home item to buy please keep our Testimonial page in mind should you go ahead with purchasing from us.

 

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Aboriginal, Art, australia, Bay Gallery Home, Dreamtime, giftware, Interior Design, NEWS, Sacred iconography, Silk scarfs

Extraterrestrial journey with Alma Nungarrayi Granites fine bone chinaware

The winter nights have drawn in so why not look at our beautiful evening skies? Perhaps you'll see a cigar-shaped alien space ship (or meteor?) gliding through it.  If you're sky is light polluted take inspiration from Australia's milky way as depicted on these teapots, mugs, sugar pots, cup and saucers, milk jugs and bowls. Alma's paintings were a sell out at her only solo UK exhibition held at Bay Gallery Home but her chinaware continues to be one of our most popular designs.  Available online www.baygalleryhome.com or in the gallery.

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Aboriginal, Art, australia, Bay Gallery Home, Dreamtime, giftware, Interior Design, NEWS, Silk scarfs

Christmas gifts ideas - Aboriginal silk scarves

These beautiful, colourful, vibrant silk scarves featuring Aboriginal designs from original artworks by two Central Desert communities in Australia make fantastic presents any time of year but as it's Christmas spoil your loved one with something totally unique.  Available in two sizes.  The Dreamtime designs come in lovely gift boxes.  Both have information about the artist and the artwork.

You can purchase online www.baygalleryhome.com or in the gallery.  £60-£120

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Dreamtime, Bay Gallery Home, australia, Art, Interior Design, inspiration, New Art, Desert Mob, NEWS

Colour in Aboriginal Art

The artists in the Communities we represent are known for their use of bold use of colour with expansive swathes of it journeying across their canvases.  Some like Shorty Jangala Robertson became known as a world class colour field abstractionist were its pioneers Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman and Clyfford Style.  Shorty would not have been aware of these artists nor their search for myth, meaning and the infinite expressed through abstraction.  Instead he would have drawn on his skin name's Dreamtime stories taking colours from what he saw around him in Australia's Central Desert. With the establishment of art centres he and the other artists accessed many fabulous acrylic paints they utilised to great effect as evidence in the art we sell.  The artists continue to experiment with  colour and technique producing an exciting body of work. Amongst those is the incredibly talented Steven Jupurrula whose work you can see below.

A good Pantone green making itself onto Aboriginal canvases including those by emerging artist Steven Jupurrula

A good Pantone green making itself onto Aboriginal canvases including those by emerging artist Steven Jupurrula

We recently sold this piece - new works by Steven Jupurrula will be in the Gallery soon.

We recently sold this piece - new works by Steven Jupurrula will be in the Gallery soon.

NEWS, My Country, land, Aboriginal, Bay Gallery Home, New Art

Sacred Garden of Eden rock hole - Kings Canyon

When we were young my parents flew a small aircraft around the Australian outback.  These were the days where you could land next to Uluru and crawl all over it allowing you to experience its awesome spiritual power.  Another sacred site we clambered all over was Kings Canyon.  The worlds largest monolith and one its most ancient canyons were formed at the same time the first life forms developed on earth - around 600 million years ago.  

Kings Canyon, covered with a plethora of fossil imprints was one of the most emotionally powerful places we'd ever encountered.  This ancient canyon reminded us how insignificant we are in the big scheme of things (although 35 years on we have the power to destroy it all - after a five year fight in June this year the traditional owners learnt the mining threat, including fracking had finally been nullified).  

While exploring Kings Canyon we came across this watering hole spending a significant part of the day enjoying its cool waters.  As Watarrka National Park, where Kings Canyon sits, has been given back to its traditional owners you can no longer swim in it.  It's now identified as a sacred men's site. We felt slightly heartbroken we couldn't share the same experience of swimming in it with our children.  Much of what we accessed all those years ago is no longer open to us in the way it was.  It gave us the slightest insight into what it must have been like to to torn from your land unable to share it's beauty and spirit with younger generations.

Rock hole found in the Garden of Eden, Kings Canyon, Australia

Rock hole found in the Garden of Eden, Kings Canyon, Australia

Kings Canyon walls above the Garden of Eden.

Kings Canyon walls above the Garden of Eden.

Bay Gallery Home, Aboriginal, Dreamtime, Desert Mob, Musée du Quai Branly, Visual Language, Sacred iconography, New Art, My Country

Papunya: taking Aboriginal Desert dot designs to the world

Papunya Tula is the legendary site where the contemporary Aboriginal art movement bloomed becoming famous for its Western Desert dot art.  

Amongst the different displaced Western Desert people's brought to Papunya Tula (Tula meaning small hill where a Honey ant dreaming sits) were Tommy Watson, Clifford Possum and Ningura Napurrula, each of whom went on to become wildly successful international artists.  

The original company now operates from Alice Springs but we paid a visit to the existing art centre and found some of the sacred iconography depicted in the early works honoured while developing new interpretations of their ancient Dreamtime stories.

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We had to keep a respectful distance while photographing the artists.  Close up the paintings were breathtaking.  Below is the landscape around the art centre.

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NEWS, Silk scarfs, giftware, inspiration

New homeware and gift ideas have arrived!

Alma Nungarrayi Granites silk scarf with beautiful gift box £60

Alma Nungarrayi Granites silk scarf with beautiful gift box £60

Bay Gallery Home has exciting new products we've added to our homeware and gift range including scarfs, hand moisturisers and new editions to our stunning, colourful fine bone china range.  

We are situated in Tetbury, the Cotswolds.  Tetbury is an ancient royal town with many beautiful independent shops.  Prince Charles lives down the road so you may bump into royalty!  We are also very close to Bath and Bristol.  If you're coming from London you come off the M4 at Junction 17.

If you can't make it the Bay Gallery Home in Tetbury you can always make your purchases online.

 

 

Murdie Nampijinpa Morris Macadamia & Goats Milk Handcream, £18

Murdie Nampijinpa Morris Macadamia & Goats Milk Handcream, £18

Otto Jungarrayi Sims fine bone china canister great for teabags, biscuits, pasta - anything you can think of really, £40

Otto Jungarrayi Sims fine bone china canister great for teabags, biscuits, pasta - anything you can think of really, £40

Father's Day weekend special exhibition 17 - 18 June 2017

Bay Gallery Home is holding a special exhibition for father's over the Father's Day weekend to offering father's a glass of wine or coffee while visiting the gallery on Saturday or Sunday.

Aboriginal Father's teach their children the many skills needed to survive in the harsh Australian outback environment.  They are instrumental in teaching their sons how to hunt and share their wood fashioning expertise to make spears, boomerangs and shields from the incredibly strong Mulga tree found throughout the desert and depicted in many of our paintings.  (we will have examples of these on display) The Father's also teach their young boys and men the Dreamtime stories through secret ceremonies and initiations some of which can take months to complete.  This repetition of the Dreamtime through ceremonial dances and song is essential to the preservation of their culture including the deep knowledge they have of the land, animals flora and fauna.

We wish you all a Happy Father's Day.  

A fantastic new painting currently being stretched ready for our Father's Day exhibition.

A fantastic new painting currently being stretched ready for our Father's Day exhibition.

Bay Gallery Home, New Art, provenance

Snapshots of our Art Sourcing Trip in the Australian Central Desert

Detail from a painting we will be bringing back to Bay Gallery Home's Gallery, a fine example of the ever-evolving work of contemporary Australian Aboriginal Artists.

Detail from a painting we will be bringing back to Bay Gallery Home's Gallery, a fine example of the ever-evolving work of contemporary Australian Aboriginal Artists.

On the road to Uluru, after being Fool-uru by Mount Conner...

On the road to Uluru, after being Fool-uru by Mount Conner...

Here's a detail from Australian Aboriginal Street Art in Papunya, by Candy - a dynamic work of Art that feels full of expression and relevance.

Here's a detail from Australian Aboriginal Street Art in Papunya, by Candy - a dynamic work of Art that feels full of expression and relevance.

Mount Conner, also called 'Fool-uru' by locals for so often being mistaken for Uluru..

Mount Conner, also called 'Fool-uru' by locals for so often being mistaken for Uluru..

Some of the rich stylistic variety of contemporary Australian Aboriginal artists, each incarnating the Artist's experience and connection with Country, their land and identity heritage.

Some of the rich stylistic variety of contemporary Australian Aboriginal artists, each incarnating the Artist's experience and connection with Country, their land and identity heritage.

Aboriginal, Bay Gallery Home, Interior Design, Made in the UK, My Country, tile, Visual Language, provenance

My Country: feeding off the land

My Country,  Bush Onion 1 ceramic tile

My Country, Bush Onion 1 ceramic tile

Bush onion, or janmarda, can be found in the river banks and are dug up using digging sticks. The Aboriginal people wait for the leaves to dry out before eating it. So long as the bulb is white inside, it will be eaten raw or cooked. 

Through her painting, the tile artist Sarah Napurrula White is telling a Bush Onion Dreaming, or Janmarda Jukurrpa. One of the main sites for this story is Purrupurru,  in the remote red centre of Australia, where you can see an old Jungarrayi man in the form of a large stone figure.

Sarah also likes to paint Bush Onion Dreamings because she likes the designs and patterns. When she’s not painting, Sarah works for the aged and children, and on weekends she loves to go hunting with the old people. 

The majority of our artists are women who play an active role in their communities, not only practically but in building communal ties through the visual language of Dreamtime painting.

With their geometric harmony, these ceramic tiles lend themselves to versatile use, from en masse styling as a splash back, to design feature in our bespoke furniture range.

Bush Onion 1 beautifully offsetting modern minimalism.

Bush Onion 1 beautifully offsetting modern minimalism.

Bush Onion 1, Cedar of Lebanon table

Bush Onion 1, Cedar of Lebanon table